Previous Contributors | Women's Report
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Previous Contributors

Every year, we are privileged to have some of the foremost experts in their fields contribute to the Women’s Report. Their insights, research, and thoughts on topics provide fresh perspectives on the advancement of gender equality at work. Experts come from the ranks of practitioners and researchers, and topics span various aspects related to women at work and the spillover of perceptions of gender at home and in society on women in paid work.

Women’s Report 2019: Women and politics

Prof. Amanda Gouws

Chapter 1: The state of women’s politics in South Africa, 25 years after democratic transition

Amanda is a professor of political science at the Stellenbosch University and is a distinguished professor holding an NRF research chair in gender politics. She holds a PhD from the University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign in the USA. Her specialisation is South African politics and gender politics, with her research focused on women and citizenship, the National Gender Machinery, and women’s representation. She is the editor of (Un)thinking citizenship: Feminist debates in contemporary South Africa. In 2007, Amanda was the Edith Keeger Wolf Distinguished Visiting Professor at Northwestern University, USA. In 2012, she received the Wilma Rule Award for the best paper at the International Political Science Association Conference in Madrid, Spain, titled “Multiculturalism in South Africa: Dislodging the binary between universal human rights and culture/tradition”. Her book with Daiva Stasiulis from Carleton University, Gender and multiculturalism: North/South perspectives, was published in 2014. She was a Commissioner for the South African Commission for Gender Equality from 2012 ‒ 2014.

Prof. Desiree Lewis

Chapter 2: Neo-liberalism, gender, and South African working women

Desiree Lewis is a professor in the Women’s and Gender Studies Department at the University of the Western Cape, South Africa. She has worked extensively on feminist theorising and politics, as well as representations of nationalism, race, gender, and sexuality. Her current research interests include the impact of neo-liberalism on feminism and humanities research, as well as critical food studies, an area where she is principal researcher of an intra-institutional Mellon-funded programme. As a transdisciplinary feminist academic, she has sought to expand her original interests in literary and cultural studies. She has guest-edited several issues of South African feminist journals and has worked collaboratively with feminists in South Africa, Sweden, Finland, the USA, India, and Germany through associate professorships, research collaboration, and visiting professor positions.

Dr Nthabiseng Moleko

Chapter 3: Do we have the tracking tools to monitor the National Gender Machinery?

Nthabiseng is the deputy chairperson of the Commission for Gender Equality. She is a development economist, and was the first black South African appointed as a core faculty member at the University of Stellenbosch Business School, where she teaches economics and statistics. As a former CEO of the Joe Gqabi Economic Development Agency and project manager and researcher at the Eastern Cape Socio-Economic Consultative Council, she has worked extensively in economic development. She has served on several boards, and is a regular commentator on national economic issues, national development, and development finance and -economics. As the first South African woman conferred a PhD in the development finance discipline, she is working on translating her research to publications.

Prof. Charlene Gerber

Chapter 4: To (queen) bee or not to bee?

Charlene Gerber started her academic career in 2000, teaching Marketing Research at the Department of Business Management, Unisa. After completing her DCom, she joined the Department of Business Management at Stellenbosch University, in 2006. In 2015, she joined Stellenbosch Business School, where she currently co-ordinates MBA research assignments and also teaches research methods. Charlene’s research interests are in the area of research methods, specifically experimental research designs.

Prof. Anton Schlechter

Chapter 4: To (queen) bee or not to bee?

Anton, PhD, is a registered industrial/organisational psychologist with the Health Professions Council of South Africa (HPCSA), and also held the post-nominal title of Chartered Human Resources Practitioner with the South African Board of People Practices (SABPP). After graduating, he worked in the Organisational Development and Training Department of Media24 (Naspers), and in 2002 joined Stellenbosch University’s Department of Industrial Psychology as a full-time academic. In 2006, he joined the School of Management Studies at the University of Cape Town (UCT) as a senior lecturer. He currently holds the rank of full professor (since 2015). Anton was the director/HOD of the School of Management Studies, UCT, from 2010 to 2017.

Women’s Report 2018: Women blue-collar workers

Dr Lize Barclay

Chapter 1: Rise of the machines: Friend or foe of female blue-collar workers?

Lize explores emerging issues, trends, and alternative future scenarios for organisations, places, and spaces, and maps paths to adapt in order to thrive within the context of environmental sustainability and social responsibility, often through simulations and gaming. Lize joined the University of Stellenbosch Business School in 2017 as a senior lecturer in futures studies and systems thinking. Her current research explores circular design and economy, gaming, cyberpunk, gentrification, hipster culture, gender, the Fourth Industrial Revolution, and indigenous knowledge systems. Previously, she spent 12 years as a lecturer in town and regional planning. She has a PhD in town and regional planning, with a focus on the use of scenario-based gaming simulation in higher education. Lize has seven years’ experience working for local and provincial government, predominantly in forward planning.

Prof. Tessa Wright

Chapter 2: How to increase women’s representation in the construction sector: Evidence from a UK project

Tessa is a professor of employment relations and co-director of the Centre for Research in Equality and Diversity, School of Business and Management, at Queen Mary University of London. She has researched and written widely on equality at work, with a focus on gender, sexuality, and intersectionality, particularly in male-dominated sectors and occupations such the fire service, construction, and transport. She is interested in interventions to overcome gender inequality at work through trade union action and the use of public procurement. She is the author of Gender and sexuality in male-dominated occupations: Women workers in construction and transport, co-author, with Sian Moore and Phil Taylor, of Fighting fire: One hundred years of the Fire Brigades Union, and co-editor, with Hazel Conley, of the Gower handbook of discrimination at work.

Dr Nthabiseng Moleko

Chapter 3: Women en route to technical vocations

Nthabiseng the deputy chairperson of the Commission for Gender Equality. She is a development economist, and was the first black South African appointed as a core faculty member at the University of Stellenbosch Business School, where she teaches economics and statistics. As a former CEO of the Joe Gqabi Economic Development Agency and project manager and researcher at the Eastern Cape Socio-Economic Consultative Council, she has worked extensively in economic development. She has served on several boards, and is a regular commentator on national economic issues, national development, and development finance and -economics. As the first South African woman conferred a PhD in the development finance discipline, she is working on translating her research to publications.

Dr Babita Mathur-Helm

Chapter 4: Lack of HR management interventions specifically directed at women blue-collar workers

Babita was a senior lecturer in leadership and human capital management at the University of Stellenbosch Business School. She held a PhD in clinical psychology from the University of Gujarat, India. Her research focus ranged across leadership studies, gender studies, cross-cultural diversity, broad-based black economic empowerment and change management, and she was published in journals locally and overseas, and had authored book chapters.

Prof. Hugo Pienaar

Chapter 5: Labour law and the trials and tribulations of women blue-collar workers

Professor Hugo Pienaar is the Director of Employment Law at Cliffe Dekker Hofmeyr Inc. He has vast experience in employment law, litigation, and dispute resolution, and represents many major corporations in South Africa. Hugo Pienaar has acted as a judge in the Labour Court, and lectures employment law part-time to postgraduates at various tertiary institutions and for the Law Society of South Africa. He has contributed to textbooks, and served on the government task team established to compile labour legislation for the state. Hugo led a study group to Malaysia and Australia to research the application of affirmative action. He has also advised on and contributed to the development of a labour framework for a major institution in the United Arab Emirates. In addition, Hugo has advised on a labour framework for a Japan-based motor-manufacturing company. He is professor extraordinaire at the North-West University and visiting professor at the University of the Free State.

Ms Prinoleen Naidoo

Chapter 5: Labour law and the trials and tribulations of women blue-collar workers

Prinoleen began her career in employment law in 2010 as a candidate attorney at Jay Reddy Attorneys, and was appointed as an associate at the same firm in 2013. She joined Cliffe Dekker Hofmeyr as an associate in 2017.

Ms Lerato Malope

Chapter 5: Labour law and the trials and tribulations of women blue-collar workers

Lerato Malope is a candidate attorney in the Employment Practice of Cliffe Dekker Hofmeyr Incorporated. She completed her LLB in 2017 at the University of the Witwatersrand. Lerato is currently pursuing her LLM with Wits University, focusing on intellectual property law.

Women’s Report 2017: Fairness in relation to women at work

Prof. Piet Naudé

Chapter 1: Women in the workplace: en route to fairness?

Piet is a professor of ethics and, until the end of September 2020, Director of the University of Stellenbosch Business School. He holds a Master’s in philosophy and a PhD in theology, and has published articles on a gender interpretation of religious texts and creeds. He has held various leadership positions in higher education, where he specifically promoted gender equity. He is a life member of the Centre for Theological Inquiry at Princeton University (USA) and a fellow of the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation in Germany.

Prof. Amanda Gouws

Chapter 2: Fairness in the family

Amanda is a professor of political science at Stellenbosch University and is a distinguished professor holding an NRF research chair in gender politics. She holds a PhD from the University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign in the USA. Her specialisation is South African politics and gender politics, with her research focused on women and citizenship, the National Gender Machinery, and women’s representation. She is the editor of (Un)thinking citizenship: Feminist debates in contemporary South Africa. In 2007, Amanda was the Edith Keeger Wolf Distinguished Visiting Professor at Northwestern University, USA. In 2012, she received the Wilma Rule Award for the best paper at the International Political Science Association Conference in Madrid, Spain, titled “Multiculturalism in South Africa: Dislodging the binary between universal human rights and culture/tradition”. Her book with Daiva Stasiulis from Carleton University, Gender and multiculturalism: North/South perspectives, was published in 2014. She was a Commissioner for the South African Commission for Gender Equality from 2012 ‒ 2014.

Prof. Anita Bosch

Chapter 3: Rethinking women’s workplace outcomes: Structural inequality

Anita holds the University of Stellenbosch Business School Research Chair dedicated to the study of women at work. She has a PhD from the School of Management of the University of Southampton (UK) and is an associate professor at the Business School, where she teaches in the organisational behaviour and leadership tracks. She is a non-executive director of the National Business Initiative, a voluntary coalition working towards sustainable growth and development in South Africa.

She is the editor of the annual Women’s Report and has published numerous public reports, articles, and book chapters on diversity and women’s issues. Anita regularly engages in public forums such as print, online and broadcast media.

Prof. Hugo Pienaar

Chapter 4: Paternity leave and the archaic gender roles entrenched in employment law

Professor Hugo Pienaar is the Director of Employment Law at Cliffe Dekker Hofmeyr Inc. He has vast experience in employment law, litigation, and dispute resolution, and represents many major corporations in South Africa. Hugo Pienaar has acted as a judge in the Labour Court, and lectures employment law part-time to postgraduates at various tertiary institutions and for the Law Society of South Africa. He has contributed to textbooks, and served on the government task team established to compile labour legislation for the state. Hugo led a study group to Malaysia and Australia to research the application of affirmative action. He has also advised on contributed to the development of a labour framework for a major institution in the United Arab Emirates. In addition, Hugo has advised on a labour framework for a Japan-based motor-manufacturing company. He is professor extraordinaire at the North-West University and visiting professor at the University of the Free State.

Ms Riola Kok

Chapter 4: Paternity leave and the archaic gender roles entrenched in employment law

Riola Kok is a candidate attorney specialising in employment law at Cliffe Dekker Hofmeyr Inc.

Prof. Mariette Coetzee

Chapter 5: Fairness as it relates to employment equity for women

Mariette holds a PhD and is an associate professor in the Department of Human Resource Management at UNISA. Her doctoral study focused on the fairness of affirmative action, organisational commitment, and the treatment of employees from designated groups in the workplace. She has co-authored books and written numerous journal articles on HR hiring practices, self-management, and remuneration management. She has supervised several postgraduate students and presented papers at both local and international conferences. Mariette is a registered Master Practitioner with SABPP, and has been appointed by President Cyril Ramaphosa to serve as a Commissioner on the Independent Commission for the remuneration of Public Office Bearers.

Women’s Report 2016: Pregnancy in the workplace

Prof. Anita Bosch

Chapter 1: Pregnancy is here to stay – or is it?

Anita holds the University of Stellenbosch Business School Research Chair dedicated to the study of women at work. She has a PhD from the School of Management of the University of Southampton (UK) and is an associate professor at the Business School, where she teaches in the organisational behaviour and leadership tracks. She is a non-executive director of the National Business Initiative, a voluntary coalition working towards sustainable growth and development in South Africa.

She is the editor of the annual Women’s Report, and has published numerous public reports, articles, and book chapters on diversity and women’s issues. Anita regularly engages in public forums such as print, online, and broadcast media.

Mrs Italia Boninelli

Chapter 2: Career decisions for women considering pregnancy

Italia is an executive coach and organisational development consultant with a Master’s in psychology from WITS and a post-graduate diploma in labour relations from UNISA. She has international experience at executive level in building human capital, culture- and change management, organisational performance enhancement, and the full range of generalist HR functions. She also has executive experience in marketing and communications, as well as strategy portfolios. Her experience spans a variety of industries in South Africa and 16 other countries. Her most recent executive role was Executive Vice President People and Organization Development at AngloGold Ashanti (2010–2016). She is a director of London-listed Polymetal International, and has served on the advisory board of two universities. She continues to lecture at business schools, is the author of numerous publications, and is a patron of Women in Mining in South Africa.

Prof. Hugo Pienaar

Chapter 3: Pregnancy and employment law in South Africa

Professor Hugo Pienaar is the Director of Employment Law at Cliffe Dekker Hofmeyr Inc. He has vast experience in employment law, litigation, and dispute resolution, and represents many major corporations in South Africa. Hugo Pienaar has acted as a judge in the Labour Court, and lectures employment law part-time to postgraduates at various tertiary institutions and for the Law Society of South Africa. He has contributed to textbooks, and served on the government task team established to compile labour legislation for the state. Hugo led a study group to Malaysia and Australia to research the application of affirmative action. He has also advised on contributed to the development of a labour framework for a major institution in the United Arab Emirates. In addition, Hugo has advised on a labour framework for a Japan-based motor-manufacturing company. He is professor extraordinaire at the North-West University and visiting professor at the University of the Free State.

Ms Elizabeth Sonnekus

Chapter 3: Pregnancy and employment law in South Africa

Elizabeth Sonnekus is a candidate attorney specialising in employment law at Cliffe Dekker Hofmeyr Inc.

Dr Linda Chipunza

Chapter 4: Menopause and the workplace

Linda Chipunza is a boardroom communications expert and coach in private practice. She holds a D Phil et Litt. degree from the University of South Africa and a Master’s degree in the teaching of English to speakers of other languages (TESOL) from Herriot Watt University in the UK. She has taught at a number of universities, where she specialised in imparting professional communication skills across a number of faculties, which included Engineering, Science, Commerce, and Sociology. Post-university-based work, Linda has worked at First National Bank as Registrar of its Learning Centre, Head of Consumer Education, and Head of Learnerships within the FirstRand group. She has also worked on a number of diverse projects as a consultant.

Mrs Elizabeth Dhlamini-Kumalo

Chapter 4: Menopause and the workplace

Elizabeth holds a Masters’ degree in management, specialising in human resources. She is one of the founding members of the Women’s National Coalition. Under her leadership, the SABPP formed the Human Resource Research Initiative. As a mentor and executive coach, Elizabeth guides HR professionals and senior managers in improving their performance. She is currently the chairperson of the SABPP HR Governance Committee, a pioneering structure to build HR governance nationally. She was an HR director at several top companies, such as Afrox, Woolworths, and Sandvik. As previous chairperson of the SABPP, Elizabeth played a key role in the transformation of the SABPP, including the adoption of the HR Voice Strategy and the development of the National HR Standards.

Women’s Report 2015: Equal Pay for Equal Value

Prof. Anita Bosch

Chapter 1: Reasons for the gender pay gap – what HR practitioners should know

Anita holds the University of Stellenbosch Business School Research Chair dedicated to the study of women at work. She has a PhD from the School of Management of the University of Southampton (UK) and is an associate professor at the Business School, where she teaches in the organisational behaviour and leadership tracks. She is a non-executive director of the National Business Initiative, a voluntary coalition working towards sustainable growth and development in South Africa.

She is the editor of the annual Women’s Report and has published numerous public reports, articles, and book chapters on diversity and women’s issues. Anita regularly engages in public forums such as print, online, and broadcast media.

Mrs Italia Boninelli

Chapter 2: The gender pay audit – practical steps for multi-national and local companies

Italia is an executive coach and organisational development consultant with a Master’s in psychology from WITS and a post-graduate diploma in labour relations from UNISA. She has international experience at executive level in building human capital, culture- and change management, organisational performance enhancement, and the full range of generalist HR functions. She also has executive experience in marketing and communications, as well as strategy portfolios. Her experience spans a variety of industries in South Africa and 16 other countries. Her most recent executive role was Executive Vice President People and Organization Development at AngloGold Ashanti (2010–2016). She is a director of London-listed Polymetal International, and has served on the advisory board of two universities. She continues to lecture at business schools, is the author of numerous publications, and is a patron of Women in Mining in South Africa.

Prof. Mark Bussin

Chapter 3: The gender pay gap – a boardroom perspective

Mark is the chairperson of 21st Century, a specialist reward and HR consultancy. He has experience across all industry sectors, and is considered a thought leader in HR and remuneration. He serves on and advises numerous boards and audit- and remuneration committees, and has consulted in many countries. Mark holds a doctorate in commerce, and has published or presented 65 academic articles and over 450 popular papers. He has appeared on television and radio and in the press for expert views. Mark has been a guest lecturer at several academic institutions, and supervises Master’s and doctoral theses. He is an EXCO member of the South African Reward Association and a WorldatWork tutor. As a past Commissioner in the Presidency, he advised on the remuneration and conditions of employment for the president, deputy ministers, judges, magistrates, parliament, and traditional leaders, and served on the King Committee in 2019.

Dr Ronél Nienaber

Chapter 3: The gender pay gap – a boardroom perspective

Ronél is an industrial psychologist and Master Reward Specialist, and is currently the vice president of Reward and Human Resources Information Systems at Sasol. She has worked in numerous human resources and rewards positions in financial services and energy sectors over the past 27 years. Ronél was a member of the SARA Executive Committee for 18 years, and was appointed by the president to serve as a Commissioner on the Independent Commission for the Remuneration of Public Office Bearers for a term of five years. Ronél chairs the Institute of Directors’ Remuneration Committee Forum, and is a member of the King Subcommittee on Remuneration.

Prof. Hugo Pienaar

Chapter 4: The meaning of equal value in terms of pay

Professor Hugo Pienaar is the Director of Employment Law at Cliffe Dekker Hofmeyr Inc. He has vast experience in employment law, litigation, and dispute resolution, and represents many major corporations in South Africa. Hugo Pienaar has acted as a judge in the Labour Court, and lectures employment law part-time to postgraduates at various tertiary institutions and for the Law Society of South Africa. He has contributed to textbooks, and served on the government task team established to compile labour legislation for the state. Hugo led a study group to Malaysia and Australia to research the application of affirmative action. He has also advised on contributed to the development of a labour framework for a major institution in the United Arab Emirates. In addition, Hugo has advised on a labour framework for a Japan-based motor-manufacturing company. He is professor extraordinaire at the North-West University and visiting professor at the University of the Free State.

Women’s Report 2014: Work and women’s reproductive health

Prof. Anita Bosch

Chapter 1: Women’s reproductive options: Career- and HR implications

Anita holds the University of Stellenbosch Business School Research Chair dedicated to the study of women at work. She has a PhD from the School of Management of the University of Southampton (UK) and is an associate professor at the Business School, where she teaches in the organisational behaviour and leadership tracks. She is a non-executive director of the National Business Initiative, a voluntary coalition working towards sustainable growth and development in South Africa.

She is the editor of the annual Women’s Report and has published numerous public reports, articles, and book chapters on diversity and women’s issues. Anita regularly engages in public forums such as print, online and broadcast media.

Dr Merwyn Jacobson

Chapter 2: Women’s fertility and work

Merwyn qualified at the University of the Witwatersrand as a medical doctor and fertility specialist. He has been involved in the practice of infertility medicine since 1978. He received postgraduate training both locally and overseas, and was one of the founding partners of Vitalab in 1984, a centre for assisted conception, located in Johannesburg (www.vitalab.com). His interests include the evaluation and treatment of the infertile couple. He has a particular interest in prenatal diagnosis and the conservation of fertility, and has been involved in the endoscopic microsurgical management of endometriosis. He has been active in many professional societies, and has been an invited speaker for several educational, public interest, and postgraduate groups for formal and informal talks on various aspects of infertility.

Mrs Bernice Lits

Chapter 3: Becoming a single mother by choice

Bernice is a psychiatric social worker specialising in the field of infertility counselling. Her professional background, spanning more than thirty years, has incorporated counselling, teaching, and research in the fields of paediatrics, fertility, psychiatry, parenting, and marital therapy. This includes psychiatric social work at Groote Schuur Hospital, Cape Town, lecturer in Community Paediatrics at the Department of Paediatrics at Witwatersrand Medical School, school counsellor, and co-ordinator of Social Services at King David School. She has also worked in the Department of Psychiatry at the Ashkelon General Hospital, Ashkelon, Israel.

Mrs Tanya Rubin

Chapter 3: Becoming a single mother by choice

Mrs Tanya Rubin qualified at the University of the Witwatersrand as a social worker. She has been involved in the practice of infertility counselling for the past 10 years. She completed her honours degree in psychology at UNISA, and recently qualified as a logotherapist. She has her own private practice at Vitalab Fertility Centre for Assisted Conception, located in Johannesburg (www.vitalab.com).

Mrs Jenni Gobind

Chapter 4: HIV/AIDS and pregnancy: Let us be positive

Jenika is a senior lecturer and director of the online PDBA Programme at Wits Business School. Her teaching and learning experience spans 15 years at a number of institutions. She has extensive experience in the private sector, having chaired multiple disciplinary hearings and consulting on labour relations and human resource issues. Her current research interests are gender inequality and the interpretation of South African labour legislation.

Mrs Monica Badenhorst

Chapter 5: Breastfeeding at work

Monica Badenhorst holds a BCur degree from the Rand Afrikaans University (RAU), now the University of Johannesburg (UJ), as well as higher qualifications in community health (RAU), nursing administration and education (University of Pretoria), South African Certified Lactation Consultant (SACLC) University of the Witwatersrand, and occupational health nursing science (UJ). She has been involved in community health nursing, working in South African municipal clinics, since 1987, and has a special interest in baby wellness clinics and counselling and assisting breastfeeding mothers. She has been in private practice, presenting ante-natal classes in breastfeeding preparation and providing support, since 1992, and currently has a part-time practice in Port Elizabeth, South Africa. Monica is an occupational health nurse practitioner who specialises in assisting women ho return to work after childbirth.

Ms Linda Biersteker

Chapter 6: Childcare in South Africa

Linda is a developmental psychologist and adult educator with nearly 40 years’ experience in research, training, and programming in early childhood development. She has numerous publications, and has undertaken a number of assignments for governments, academic institutions, NGOs, donors, and international agencies. Formerly Research Director at the Early Learning Resource Unit, Cape Town, she consults independently. Linda has undertaken extensive research and development of ECD policy, programming, and training strategies in South Africa, the SADC region, and internationally. Her current focus is the scale-up of effective quality interventions targeting vulnerable young children and their caregivers and the development of contextually appropriate measures of programme quality and child development outcomes.

Women’s Report 2013: Women and political leadership

Ms Lindiwe Makunga

Chapter 1: Women’s political leadership in contemporary South Africa: Form over substance?

Lindiwe Makhunga is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Political Studies at Wits University, and researches primarily in the field of gender politics, conflict and development, and institutional settings. She holds an MA degree (cum laude) in Gender and Development from the Institute of Development Studies, Sussex University. She completed her undergraduate degree in politics at Wits University, and has been working in the area of gender equality since early 2008 as a researcher and activist. Her specific interests are gender relations in post-conflict settings, governance, and legislative politics.

Mrs Jenni Gobind

Chapter 2: The Employment Equity Act has failed women

Jenika is a senior lecturer and director of the online PDBA Programme at Wits Business School. Her teaching and learning experience spans 15 years at a number of institutions. She has extensive experience in the private sector, having chaired multiple disciplinary hearings, and consulting on labour relations and human resource issues. Her current research interests are gender inequality and the interpretation of South African labour legislation.

Leanne Meyer

Chapter 3: Leadership insights from the United States

Leanne holds a Master’s degree in industrial psychology, and is the executive director of the Accelerate Leadership Center at the Tepper School of Business and Program Director of the Carnegie Mellon Leadership and Negotiation Academy for Women. Leanne’s work is focused on assisting leaders in navigating critical inflection points, where many have outgrown their professional identity and, given the demands and responsibility of their roles, need to change their perspectives regarding what is important. They are advised accordingly on how they spend their time and what new skill sets and behaviours to develop.

Mrs Renate Volpe

Chapter 4: Understanding political intelligence in the workplace

Renate is an influencer and futurist. She had a substantial corporate career in the mining industry prior to branching out as an entrepreneur. Her speciality fields are change management, leadership, intrapreneurship, and career management. Of late, she has shifted her focus to social activism against gender-based violence. Renate founded Believe South Africa, a gender equity think tank, and her personal focus is emotional abuse (the relationship between the narcissistic personality and the co-dependent person). Her most recent co-publication in this field is Senseless sacrifice, givers and takers in relationships.

Leigh Leo

Chapter 5: Gender and workplace bullying

Leigh is studying towards a Master’s degree in Industrial Psychology at the University of Johannesburg and holds a B.Com Honours degree (cum laude) in industrial psychology at the same institution. She is currently involved in research in the field of embodied cognition and consumer psychology, which looks at the role of incidental haptic sensations in consumer judgments of a brand. Her interests lie in empowering people with the knowledge to make better decisions. Leigh is currently registered as a student psychologist with the Health Professions Council of South Africa.

Robyn Oberholzer (née Reid)

Chapter 5: Gender and workplace bullying

Robyn is a Manager in Deloitte’s Human Capital Organization Transformation practice. Robyn has 6+ years of consulting experience serving a wide range of clients on organisation design, HR transformations, process redesign, change management and strategic communications. Robyn’s experience spans across HR, Supply Chain, Consumer, Finance and Mining industry/clients. ​She advises clients on optimising organisation structures, transforming their culture, and planning and executing strategic change management and communications programs.​ She works with clients to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of their operations through business process design, operating model shifts and improving workforce performance.

Madelyn Geldenhuys

Chapter 6: A statistical update on women in the South African workplace

Madelyn is registered with the Health Professions Council of South Africa as an organisational psychologist and holds a PhD degree in organisational psychology. She is currently an associate professor of psychology at the Australian College of Applied Psychology and a senior research associate at the University of Johannesburg, South Africa. Her previous work experience includes appointments as associate professor in organisational psychology at the University of Johannesburg, as well as private consultation work in her capacity as organisational psychologist. She has active research interests in work-related health and well-being, women in the workplace, and positive organisational behaviour.

Women’s Report 2012: Practical equity

Abeba Beyenne Mengistu

Chapter 1: Child care in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

Lecturer, Department of Administrative Services Management, School of Commerce, Addis Ababa University, Ethiopia

Prof. Louise du Toit

Chapter 2: Sexuality and the workplace

Louise is an associate professor in the Department of Philosophy at SU. Her research interests lie in European and African traditions, and include a wide range of themes within feminist philosophy, such as sexual violence, critical theory, political philosophy, hermeneutics, philosophy and literature, phenomenology, legal philosophy, environmental philosophy, and feminist philosophy of religion. She is the author of A philosophical investigation of rape: The making and unmaking of the feminine self, and is currently working on a second monograph with the title Sexual violence and political transition. Louise was guest editor of “Rape and its meaning/s”, a special edition of Philosophical Papers. She has been involved in several international research collaborations, and recently held research fellowships at the Center of Theological Inquiry at Princeton, the School of Law at Bristol University, and Stellenbosch Institute of Advanced Study.

Mr Nelius Boshoff

Chapter 3: Women in South African academia – a statistical profile

Senior Researcher, Centre for Research on Evaluation, Science and Technology (CREST), University of Stellenbosch

Prof. Anita Bosch

Chapter 3: Women in South African academia – a statistical profile

Anita holds the University of Stellenbosch Business School Research Chair dedicated to the study of women at work. She has a PhD from the School of Management of the University of Southampton (UK) and is an associate professor at the Business School, where she teaches in the organisational behaviour and leadership tracks. She is a non-executive director of the National Business Initiative, a voluntary coalition working towards sustainable growth and development in South Africa.

She is the editor of the annual Women’s Report and has published numerous public reports, articles, and book chapters on diversity and women’s issues. Anita regularly engages in public forums such as print, online, and broadcast media.

Dr Penny Abbott

Chapter 4: Retention of women in the workplace – what HR practitioners can do

Head of the HR Research Initiative of the South African Board for People Practices

Mrs Jenni Gobind

Chapter 5: Mitigation of maternity leave pay

Jenika is a senior lecturer and director of the online PDBA Programme at Wits Business School. Her teaching and learning experience spans 15 years at a number of institutions. She has extensive experience in the private sector, having chaired multiple disciplinary hearings, and consulting on labour relations and human resource issues. Her current research interests are gender inequality and the interpretation of South African labour legislation.

Prof. Stella M Nkomo

Chapter 6: Research on women in management: Triumphs, progress, and pitfalls

Stella is a professor in the Department of Human Resource Management at the University of Pretoria. Her research has focused on diversity, difference, and race and gender in organisations, particularly the exclusion of marginalised voices in management and organisation studies. She is the co-author of the critically acclaimed book Our separate ways: Black and white women and the struggle for professional identity. Her research has been published widely, and she is on the editorial board of several management journals. Stella has received numerous awards for her scholarly contributions, and is an A-rated researcher. Her current research focus is management challenges in Africa.